Law and policy round-up: Hillsborough verdict, judicial policy, sovereignty of parliament, etc

4th May 2016

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Hillsborough verdicts

David Conn has set out at the Guardian a powerful critique of the legal process in the new Hillsborough inquest: The other villain of Hillsborough saga: legal system that left families in torment.  David Conn is an excellent journalist and it is fascinating to see what he made of the legal process as an outsider looking in.

The UK human rights blog has provided a useful round-up of links on the legal aspects of the verdicts.

My own contribution, on how the Human Rights Act and ECHR made the scope of the new Hillsborough inquest possible, is at the Financial Times.

Public law and private law

Sir Henry Brooke, the retired senior judge who has transformed into an outstanding legal blogger, has posted his talk on private law for public lawyers.

The judiciary and public policy

The Lord Chief Justice was questioned yesterday by MPs. The questions covered a range of justice policy topics – not just judicial pensions, though that was picked up by the press – and the answers are worth reading.

Sovereignty of parliament

Over at the Financial Times I have posted the first of what will be a series of pieces exploring laws and legislation. The first is on the fragility of “parliamentary sovereignty”.  Further posts in the series will be on bad legislation and the government’s apparent misuse of statutory instruments.

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Law and policy round-up: Theresa May’s call for the UK to leave the ECHR

26th April 2016

Human Rights and ECHR

Theresa May, the Home Secretary, gave a speech yesterday which included a call for the United Kingdom to leave the European Convention on Human Rights.

The speech is set out in full at ConservativeHome, and (as it appears to be a statement on behalf of her department) it is also now on the Home Office site.

The statement is, of course, more about the politics of Brexit and succession to the Tory leadership than anything serious about law and policy.  It is a sort of counter-balance to her position on the UK remaining in the European Union.

For a number of reasons, not least that the Good Friday agreement requires the ECHR to have continual legal effect in Northern Ireland, this demand will go nowhere.

(I set out the seven hurdles for repeal of the Human Rights Act and for UK leaving the ECHR – including the problems presented by Northern Ireland and Scottish devolution –  in a post here last May.)

Given the office Theresa May holds, it is worth taking a moment to look at the Northern Ireland point, for the UK to leave the ECHR would require the UK to reopen and renegotiate the Good Friday agreement.

Any change to the agreement would, in turn, require fresh referendums in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

It would also risk alienating the nationalists who accepted the Police Service of Northern Ireland only as long as it was subject to the ECHR.

It is, in all, a remarkable demand for a serving Home Secretary to make, and it is also extraordinary for the Home Office to post the statement on their own site as if it is government policy – and here it should be noted that policy on the Human Rights Act is (supposedly) under the Ministry of Justice, and not the Home Office.

This does not seem thought through. One suspects the Home Secretary does not realise (or does not care) about the implications of the UK leaving the ECHR – perhaps her desire to send a political signal to Tory back-benchers and the popular media is too great.

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Law and policy round-up: media law, Brevik and human rights, legal aid and access to justice

25th April 2016

The media, defamation and lawyers

Excellent post at Law Society Gazette on the state of current media law litigation, especially the impact of the Defamation Act 2013.

Breivik reminds us human rights never stand alone

Nick Cohen takes on the “what about Brevik” counterpoint to the concept of absolute human rights.

Legal aid cuts have led to surge in DIY defence, says charity

Good article (though one with a dull title) on the recent Transform Justice report. Includes this eye-catching example:

https://twitter.com/taxbod/status/724115206801108992

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Law and policy round-up: Do Ministers know best?

10th February 2016

This is today’s law and policy round-up.

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Ministers really do know best, it would seem.

A couple of days ago the Attorney-General – whose office is still narked at losing the Evans and Prince of Wales letter case [2015] UKSC 21 – gave a speech where he explained why ministers were better guardians of the public interest than judges.

And yesterday at a parliamentary committee, Justice Minister Shailesh Vara responded defiantly to powerful recent criticism by the Master of the Rolls on the shoddy MoJ research into the effect of court fees.

But meanwhile, back in the real world, the Intelligence and Security Select Committee published a scathing report on how Ministers did not have any clue why they were asking for the surveillance powers in the new Investigatory Powers Bill.

It would appear Ministers do not know best, after all.

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Law and policy round-up: three points about Cameron’s prisons speech

9th February 2016

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Prisons policy

Yesterday was a busy and perhaps significant day for prisons policy.

The Prime Minister gave a speech devoted to the subject.  The speech was even trailed with two government announcements here and (on treatment of pregnant women in prison) here.

Frances Crook of the Howard League gave the speech a cautious welcome and Ellie Dunt, also of the Howard League, correctly observed that the most significant thing about the speech was that the Prime Minister was giving it.

There are three things worth noting about the speech and what may be behind it.

First, prisons are expensive even if “law and order” rhetoric is cheap. Wise politicians realise this and know that the current approach to prisons policy is financially unsustainable, regardless of what lines voters and tabloids clap along with.  The current policy also makes no real sense from a crime prevention perspective and is best seen as one devised by a mischievous demon.

Second, there is a move in right wing thought against custodial sentences as the default punishment for crime, especially in the United States.  (I wrote about this in 2013 at the FT.)  This development in right wing thought may be having an influence on Michael Gove.

Third, if such a speech is indeed the political price Micheal Gove has extracted from David Cameron for support on the EU referendum issue, then it is a good bargain.

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Law and policy round-up: British Bill of Rights, Assange.

8th February 2016

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Here are some interesting links on recent news involving law and policy.

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“British Bill of Rights”

Last week the Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary Michael Gove appeared before a House of Lords committee to discuss the government’s proposals for repeal of the Human Rights Act and a “British Bill of Rights”.

It soon became clear that the government still has no clear idea what to do.  The “British Bill of Rights” continues to be a grand title on an otherwise blank piece of paper on a desk somewhere in the Ministry of Justice.  The “seven hurdles” for repeal of the Human Rights Act which I posited last May still stand and have not been overcome.

You can watch the appearance here and the transcript of the hearing is here.

A great report of the hearing is by my FT colleague Kate Allen and RightsInfo has a useful analysis.

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Assange

A rather strange and unconvincing “opinion” about arbitrary detention and Julian Assange was released last week by a UN working group.

You can read the report here, though the eight paragraph dissent at the end says all that should be said.

On this report, the best commentary so far has been by Joshua Rozenberg at the Guardian and Carl Gardner at Head of Legal.

My own short “explainer” piece is at the end of this FT news report.

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Law and policy round-up – legal aid crisis, court and tribunal fees, freedom of information

22nd July 2015

Legal Aid Crisis

MoJ and criminal legal aid solicitors to meet tomorrow (Thursday) – Monidipa Fouzder at Law Society Gazette

MoJ tries to keep a brave face amid signs of legal strike panic – Ian Dunt at Politics.co.uk

Comparison of what Michael Gove first said about teachers and what he is now saying about lawyers – A view from the North

The “Save Legal Aid” Crisis – is an end(game) in sight? – here at Jack of Kent

Courts and Tribunals

The House of Commons Justice Committee announce major inquiry into the effect of court and tribunal fees

Freedom of Information

Is this the end for the Freedom of Information Act? – Christopher Cook at Newsnight

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