The push-me-pull-yous of public policy: surveillance and freedom of information

1st March 2016

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“If you have nothing to hide then you have nothing to fear.”

Adage, attributable to someone or other.

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Surveillance and freedom of information are the push-me-pull-yous of public policy.

Those politicians and officials in favour of ever-more surveillance will assure you that if you have nothing to hide then you have nothing to fear.

But many politicians and officials – often the same ones urging greater powers of surveillance – want to weaken the freedom of information rights of the citizen against public bodies.  It would seem politicians and officials need the “safe spaces” which they also wish to deny the citizen.

Of course, this is a contradiction: the politicians and officials cannot – at least not intellectually – have it both ways.

At base the debates about surveillance and freedom of information are about the relationship of the citizen and the “state” – who knows what about whom.  And if politicians and officials want to know more about the citizens, then the same principle of transparency should first be applied to public activities.

After all, if politicians and officials have nothing to hide then they surely have nothing to fear.

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Law and policy round-up: Do Ministers know best?

10th February 2016

This is today’s law and policy round-up.

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Ministers really do know best, it would seem.

A couple of days ago the Attorney-General – whose office is still narked at losing the Evans and Prince of Wales letter case [2015] UKSC 21 – gave a speech where he explained why ministers were better guardians of the public interest than judges.

And yesterday at a parliamentary committee, Justice Minister Shailesh Vara responded defiantly to powerful recent criticism by the Master of the Rolls on the shoddy MoJ research into the effect of court fees.

But meanwhile, back in the real world, the Intelligence and Security Select Committee published a scathing report on how Ministers did not have any clue why they were asking for the surveillance powers in the new Investigatory Powers Bill.

It would appear Ministers do not know best, after all.

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Law and policy round-up – legal aid crisis, court and tribunal fees, freedom of information

22nd July 2015

Legal Aid Crisis

MoJ and criminal legal aid solicitors to meet tomorrow (Thursday) – Monidipa Fouzder at Law Society Gazette

MoJ tries to keep a brave face amid signs of legal strike panic – Ian Dunt at Politics.co.uk

Comparison of what Michael Gove first said about teachers and what he is now saying about lawyers – A view from the North

The “Save Legal Aid” Crisis – is an end(game) in sight? – here at Jack of Kent

Courts and Tribunals

The House of Commons Justice Committee announce major inquiry into the effect of court and tribunal fees

Freedom of Information

Is this the end for the Freedom of Information Act? – Christopher Cook at Newsnight

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