Law and policy round-up: Theresa May’s call for the UK to leave the ECHR

26th April 2016

Human Rights and ECHR

Theresa May, the Home Secretary, gave a speech yesterday which included a call for the United Kingdom to leave the European Convention on Human Rights.

The speech is set out in full at ConservativeHome, and (as it appears to be a statement on behalf of her department) it is also now on the Home Office site.

The statement is, of course, more about the politics of Brexit and succession to the Tory leadership than anything serious about law and policy.  It is a sort of counter-balance to her position on the UK remaining in the European Union.

For a number of reasons, not least that the Good Friday agreement requires the ECHR to have continual legal effect in Northern Ireland, this demand will go nowhere.

(I set out the seven hurdles for repeal of the Human Rights Act and for UK leaving the ECHR – including the problems presented by Northern Ireland and Scottish devolution –  in a post here last May.)

Given the office Theresa May holds, it is worth taking a moment to look at the Northern Ireland point, for the UK to leave the ECHR would require the UK to reopen and renegotiate the Good Friday agreement.

Any change to the agreement would, in turn, require fresh referendums in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

It would also risk alienating the nationalists who accepted the Police Service of Northern Ireland only as long as it was subject to the ECHR.

It is, in all, a remarkable demand for a serving Home Secretary to make, and it is also extraordinary for the Home Office to post the statement on their own site as if it is government policy – and here it should be noted that policy on the Human Rights Act is (supposedly) under the Ministry of Justice, and not the Home Office.

This does not seem thought through. One suspects the Home Secretary does not realise (or does not care) about the implications of the UK leaving the ECHR – perhaps her desire to send a political signal to Tory back-benchers and the popular media is too great.

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Five things about David Cameron and sovereignty

9th March 2016

Here are five things to remember when you hear the Prime Minister praise the “sovereignty of parliament”.

First, ministers and officials are encouraged to use statutory instruments as much as possible, which do not get proper parliamentary scrutiny.

Second, the government has sought to cut the “Short money” which funds the scrutiny work of opposition parties in parliament.

Third, the government is seeking to push through the Investigatory Powers Bill through parliament at speed, just as it did with the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act.

Fourth, when the House of Lords (sensibly) rejected cuts to certain benefits (which were later dropped), Cameron sought to limit the power of the Lords.

Fifth, when the Speaker of the House of Commons was seen as too independent, the (then Coalition) government under Cameron attempted (and failed) to get the Speaker sacked.

Take together the increasing use of secondary legislation, the attempts to cut Short money, the rushing of primary legislation, the attempt to limit the Lords, and the plans to eject the Speaker – and the evidence does not show that Cameron and his government have any sincere respect for the sovereignty of parliament.

In fact, the evidence contradicts the notion that Cameron and his government believe in the rights and prerogatives of the legislature.

And this is without the ongoing tendency for major announcements to be leaked to the press, or to be revealed on chat shows, rather than on the floor of the Commons.

In essence, it is not the sovereignty of parliament which is being claimed by Cameron and his ministers, but the sovereignty of the government once it has a Commons majority; what a former Conservative Lord Chancellor called an “elective dictatorship“.

The rhetoric may be about the sovereighty of parliament, but the practice of the current government (as with previous governments) is to undermine parliament in as many ways as possible.

It is not Brussels which is the greatest enemy of the Westminster parliament but Whitehall.

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Estragon’s boot: the Conservatives delay the repeal of the Human Rights Act

27th February 2016

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Estragon, sitting on a low mound, is trying to repeal the Human Rights Act.

He pulls at it with both hands.

He gives up, rests, tries again.

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According to a news report today, the Conservative government has “shelved” the proposals to repeal the Human Rights Act and replace it with a “British Bill of Rights”.

This is not a surprise. It was never going to be an easy task.

In the last week or so, the proposals – as well as a daft and dappy “Sovereignty Bill” proposal – have been nothing other than tokens in a political game between the Prime Minister and other Conservative politicians about supporting and opposing Brexit.  But the tokens turned out to have no value and no purchase in this game.

Last May this blog set out the “seven hurdles” for repeal of the Human Rights Act.  These hurdles included the facts that the Good Friday Agreement requires the European Convention on Human Rights to have local effect in Northern Ireland and that Scotland would have a veto on the replacement legislation.

These were real hurdles, and they could not be wished away in a game of tokens.

The hurdles are still there.

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The Human Rights Act is not likely to be repealed this Parliament.

Even if the Conservatives could agree on the proposals, and somehow had solutions to the problems presented by Northern Ireland and Scotland, the parliamentary arithmetic is against them: it is an issue which divides the Conservatives and would unite the opposition parties in both houses.

The Act is not a perfect piece of legislation, even for supporters of human rights law.  It actually does not do a lot which could not be done by courts drawing on other, domestic case law; but it does enough.

And the Conservatives have begun to realise that it is not worth the time and the effort of repealing and replacing it.

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Estragon with a supreme effort succeeds in pulling off his boot. He peers inside it, feels about inside it, turns it upside down, shakes it, looks on the ground to see if anything has fallen out, finds nothing, feels inside it again, staring sightlessly before him.

“Nothing.”

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With apologies to Samuel Beckett.

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Law and policy round-up: British Bill of Rights, Assange.

8th February 2016

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Here are some interesting links on recent news involving law and policy.

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“British Bill of Rights”

Last week the Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary Michael Gove appeared before a House of Lords committee to discuss the government’s proposals for repeal of the Human Rights Act and a “British Bill of Rights”.

It soon became clear that the government still has no clear idea what to do.  The “British Bill of Rights” continues to be a grand title on an otherwise blank piece of paper on a desk somewhere in the Ministry of Justice.  The “seven hurdles” for repeal of the Human Rights Act which I posited last May still stand and have not been overcome.

You can watch the appearance here and the transcript of the hearing is here.

A great report of the hearing is by my FT colleague Kate Allen and RightsInfo has a useful analysis.

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Assange

A rather strange and unconvincing “opinion” about arbitrary detention and Julian Assange was released last week by a UN working group.

You can read the report here, though the eight paragraph dissent at the end says all that should be said.

On this report, the best commentary so far has been by Joshua Rozenberg at the Guardian and Carl Gardner at Head of Legal.

My own short “explainer” piece is at the end of this FT news report.

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